Tag: league against cruel sports

Podcast: Checking in with Nick Weston, League Against Cruel Sports

Here at The War on Wildlife Project we were thinking that as us campaigners, conservationists, and activists can’t get out to meet and see each other now, how about creating something to bring the conservation community together – everyone from individuals to grassroots organisations to larger charities – something that reminds us all that we’re still out there, still working, but that also shows the human side of things during this COVID-19 crisis. We could think of them as ‘check-ins’ – as in ‘checking-in to make sure we’re all okay’.

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Snares: legally binding

Snares are still widely used around the world. They’re cheap to make, easy to use, light to carry, quickly replaced if you can’t quite remember where you left them, and – good news if you’re an ivory or bushmeat poacher – far quieter than a rifle so won’t alert forest or park rangers when you’re out committing wildlife crime. But, asks Charlie Moores, are they still being used here, are they legal, and if so why…

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Fox Hunts | How Many?!

It seems to have skipped the notice of many of the UK’s many fox/stag/hare hunters that in 2002 Scotland passed the Protection Of Wild Mammals Act and that England and Wales passed the Hunting Act 2004 (which came into force in early 2005). Perhaps there wasn’t enough publicity at the time – or every year since. In fact there are hundreds of hunts still operating, and now, writes Charlie Moores, the League Against Cruel Sports have devised an interactive map to show exaclty where they are.

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Yorkshire Water to change the way it manages its land

Campaigning organisations Ban Bloodsports on Yorkshire’s Moors and the League Against Cruel Sports have welcomed a commitment from Yorkshire Water to change the way it manages its land. Instead of automatically renewing the leases for grouse shooting, the utility company – Yorkshire’s largest landowner – will instead review each one to decide if grouse shooting will be allowed to continue.

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