Tag: shooting

What The Actual F(ire)

The country is in lockdown because of a respiratory virus. Huge numbers of us are worried about our jobs, our safety – our lives. Our public services are stretched to the limit. The heroes of the NHS are working until they collapse. In an unprecedented period where we’re all being asked to pull together for the good of the nation, when there is a new focus on discovering solace in nature, when we’re engaged in a real debate about our environment, climate change, and how we treat wildlife, what do those essential keyworkers who strive to raise unnaturally high numbers of Red Grouse for the gun do? Start a fire, and lose control of it.

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Snares: legally binding

Snares are still widely used around the world. They’re cheap to make, easy to use, light to carry, quickly replaced if you can’t quite remember where you left them, and – good news if you’re an ivory or bushmeat poacher – far quieter than a rifle so won’t alert forest or park rangers when you’re out committing wildlife crime. But, asks Charlie Moores, are they still being used here, are they legal, and if so why…

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Gamekeeping’s war on wildlife

The Moorland Monitors is a grassroots community network working to protect precious wildlife and habitat on the grouse shooting moors of the Peak District. On the 13th March they posted images on their Facebook page which showed tunnel traps designed to catch and kill Stoats. The photos caused an immediate reaction across social media, with questions being asked whether traps like these are legal and why weren’t the Peak District National Park authorities doing something about them. Reasonable questions which Charlie Moores does his best to answer…

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Language Matters: ‘gamebird’, game bird, gamebird?

Language encodes and externalises our thoughts. The way we use it, writes Charlie Moores, expresses externally what we think about the person, animal or object we are describing. Sometimes we use language too casually, without questioning, and sometimes outside influences affect the words we use. Over many years, for example, we have been persuaded by agricultural and hunting/shooting interests. So should we use ‘gamebird’ at all?

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