Search Results for: national park

Guest post | The march of progress?

Over the last few years I have started to feel that the driving force is of ‘progress at any cost’, and that there have been minimal checks and allowances made for wildlife on some long-term development projects. For instance we have ‘suffered’ a major road expansion. Many people will have spent far too long on the A14, the major east-west route through the county, either before it was improved, or during the recent three years of its improvement. Right from the start many of us were horrified when trees containing rookeries were felled…Guest post by Louise Bacon

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Guest Post: Not our Tiddles!

“It’s that time of year when we look out the window and see birds building their nests. Some have already got young, we can hear the hungry cries of nestlings, and see the busy parents bringing back food for a nest full of gaping mouths. Soon baby birds will start to fledge, test their wings and leave the nest. Once out, a fledgeling is beset with danger. Owls, weasels, magpies, crows, foxes, and even rats will take and eat a baby bird, but of course cats are prolific, and arguably the least justifiable, bird hunters.” Guest post by campaigner, activist and cat-lover Emily Jones

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Birds of Poole Harbour

This week the Birds of Poole Harbour (BoPH) team made the quick walk along Poole harbourfront to Lush’s Dolphin Quays offices to talk about the charity and the (surprisingly) numerous projects they’re all working on. BoPH founder Paul Morton and Liaison Officers Liv Cooper and Joe Parker gave an entertaining and zippy three-part presentation, explaining in an energised hour everything from how the group was founded and the local habitats and sites it has helped restore, to the launch of its ‘Engagement HQ’ and its flagship translocation Osprey Project.

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Guest post: Denise Goodfellow | Gamba Grass Control

“I first encountered Gamba grass about twenty years ago. The ramifications that this four metre high weed could have for fauna and flora were obvious. Gamba was rapidly spreading, transforming woodland into monotypic grassland by outcompeting native plants and fueling dangerous conflagrations. Vegetation that had evolved over aeons to carry cool fire died, from tiny grasses to the tallest stringybarks.” Guest post by Australian biologist Denise Goodfellow.

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Conservative Manifesto and fox hunting

Boris Johnson launched the Conservatives’ general election Manifesto over the weekend. The focus was on spending plans and Brexit, but one line has seen significant comment from pro-wildlife campaigners. At the bottom of page 43 was the short statement: “We will make no changes to the Hunting Act”. What, asks Charlie Moores, would that mean in reality?

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