Dead and Dying | Old World Vultures 101

Vultures have a bit of a poor reputation. They’re often thought of as little more than dirty scavengers with ‘faces only a mother could love’, typically photographed with their heads stuck inside a corpse or fighting over dead or dying animals. The reality, though, is more nuanced. And, as Charlie Moores writes, they are now one of the most threatened groups of birds on the planet.

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The Rubber Dodo Award 2019

The North American-based Center for Biological Diversity (CBD) – which works to secure a future for all species, great and small, hovering on the brink of extinction, through science, law and creative media, with a focus on protecting the lands, waters and climate that species need to survive – is launching its annual search for “the most outrageous eco-villain of 2019”. As you might expect, writes Charlie Moores. Trump-appointees and relatives feature, but who – or what – might we nominate here in the UK?

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Mary Colwell | ‘Curlew Action’ Crowdfunder

Next week the WoW Project will be interviewing irrepressible broadcaster and wildlife author Mary Colwell for a podcast. In recent years Mary has posited the idea of a Natural History GCSE, and highlighted the decline of the Curlew, a once familiar bird of open countryside but a species now in rapid decline. She recently launched a Crowdfunder to help produce a Curlew Fieldworker’s Toolkit designed to reverse the Curlew’s fortunes.

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Australia on fire: can its endemic wildlife recover?

Adelaide based photographer Brad Fleet‘s image of a charred Kangaroo, caught in a fence as it fled the bushfires destroying the east of the continent, went viral this week. It seemed for a moment to shift the focus away from human catastrophe to the impact the fires are having on wildlife and the vast loss of irreplaceable bush and forest habitat. Can, writes Charlie Moores, its endemic wildlife ever recover?

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