Search Results for: ban bloodsports

Guest Post | Birders for Ethical Conservation

“In 2018 three longstanding members and supporters of the RSPB wrote to the charity asking them to stop killing foxes, corvids and mustelids. While the authors recognised that the RSPB does, of course, carry out a lot of good and positive work, we believed that the RSPB’s stance on lethal predator control, in the name of conservation and protecting selected species (such as curlews), was unacceptable and wrong. Urgent change was required to implement policies and practices that are ethical and humane, and promote the use of alternative measures to killing.” Guest post by Birders for Ethical Conservation

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38 Degrees | Help struggling businesses – not fox hunting groups

“Shropshire County Council has given money that was intended to help businesses struggling because of COVID…to fox hunting groups. While shops on our high streets close their doors, aid that’s meant to help them weather the Covid-19 crisis has gone to fund cruel bloodsports instead. Animal welfare groups and some MPs are already kicking up a fuss. Now what’s needed is a massive outcry from the public – to show we don’t want public funds going to groups that are propping up this cruel practice. Will you sign the petition now?” 38 Degrees petition

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Mendip Farmers Hunt – hound killed on busy road

Warning – distressing image in this post:
Wiltshire Hunt Saboteurs yesterday witnessed a hunting hound used by the Mendip Farmers Hunt – whose website proclaims “We love to see visitors and children and we hunt Wednesday and Saturday in the season” – killed on the busy A39. Apart from the absurdity of even being able to state openly that they ‘hunt twice a week in the season’ (‘hunt’ not ‘trail’ or ‘drag’ hunt, and how is there even a season for this disgusting hobby?), apart from the chilling notion of involving children in bloodsports, how – all right-minded people will be asking – if hounds were following a laid-down scent as they were supposed to be, how could they have ended up on a main road dodging cars?

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Forestry Commission Chair on hunt sabs and transparency (FOI request)

Jack Riggall, an independent hunt monitor and anti-hunting campaigner, is writing a series of posts for us on fox hunts and Forestry England, and we were intrigued to be forwarded a letter this week obtained under a Freedom of Information (FOI) request to Defra which at the very least suggests that Sir William Worsley, the newly-appointed Chair of the Forestry Commission (Forestry England is an Executive Agency of the Forestry Commission), is not well inclined towards Hunt Saboteurs (who work in the field to protect wild animals from illegal hunting of course) or ‘animal rights and environmental activists’.

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Guest Post | Forestry England & Fox Hunting #2 – the Chair’s Endorsement of Bloodsport Lobbyists

This second entry is just a brief outline of something that I think should be highlighted. Throughout the last hunting season, Forestry England gave out 34 ‘trail’ hunting licences. It didn’t really seem to matter what hunts did [with the exception of the Kimblewick Hunt], as hunters were at various times convicted and investigated with no apparent impact on how Forestry England considered licence applications. Part way through the season, the Forestry Commission appointed a new Chair, Sir William Worsley. The Commissioner’s Register of Interests were later published and amongst other things, the new Chairman is a member of the Countryside Alliance, the pro-bloodsports lobby group.

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Shooting and lead shot

There has been a ripple of news around a ‘decision’ that the shooting industry is planning to ban the use of lead shot. Well, ‘ban’ as in spending another five years of polluting the environment with a toxic product, poisoning waterbirds that pick up lead shot thinking it’s grit (many birds swallow grit to help grind fibrous food material in their gizzards), and ignoring the inconvenient fact that non-toxic alternatives exist and are widely used. However, Charlie Moores writes, we’ve been here before – and is this the issue we should be most concerned about anyway?

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