Tag: conservation

How would you use a small grant to help tackle the war on wildlife?

That was the question we were asked recently: if the War on Wildlife Project were given a donation, how would you use it to help tackle the war on wildlife? What a question! So what would we do? Make a one-off lump sum donation, perhaps – many organisations are desperate for finance after lockdown after all. Or perhaps break up that money into smaller grants, spreading it across a number of smaller organisations or groups to help them fund their work? We’ve obviously thought long and hard about what to do, and while there are numerous charities/sanctuaries we would always like to help, we think that setting up an ‘equipment fund’ to help smaller groups buy items to use in the field like video cameras, go-pros, recording equipment etc would be the most effective way to distribute the money we’ve been given. We would really like to know: would an offer to buy equipment be useful to you or your group? What items do you need? Do you have a better idea? Please let us know in the comments or on social media.

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Guest Post: Craig Jones | Ethical Photography

“Photography and Wildlife Ethics. Some might say what does that mean? Does it matter? It matters to me to such an extent that I am always honest in declaring the circumstances under which a photograph has been taken. I never use digital manipulation to misrepresent a subject or mislead the viewer. And I will never sell any of my images to any publication or organisation that promotes any form of hunting or killing of wildlife. But there is a bigger picture. For many nature lovers the ‘weapon of choice’ now is the camera. Use it wrongly and you can impact on the lives of creatures that have no voice, that won’t be able to report your actions.” Guest post by Craig Jones

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Podcast: Checking in with Erich Hoyt, Research Fellow at Whale and Dolphin Conservation

Here at The War on Wildlife Project we were thinking that as us campaigners, conservationists, and activists can’t get out to meet and see each other now, how about creating something to bring the conservation community together – everyone from individuals to grassroots organisations to larger charities – something that reminds us all that we’re still out there, still working, but that also shows the human side of things during this COVID-19 crisis. We could think of them as ‘check-ins’ – as in ‘checking-in to make sure we’re all okay’.

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Podcast: Dr Nial Moores – Coronavirus and South Korea, a personal perspective

My name is Charlie Moores and under normal circumstances I wouldn’t record over Skype and I would be discussing biodiversity or campaigns affecting wildlife, but like pretty much everyone else at the moment I’m thinking about Covid-19, the coronavirus crisis that is sweeping the world, and wondering how it might be affecting my conservationist brother, Dr Nial Moores, who for the last twenty years has been living in Busan, a city in South Korea. Obviously I’ve been concerned about him, but his perspective on the reaction to the crisis has been so interesting I thought we’d record the conversation for a podcast…

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Birds of Poole Harbour

This week the Birds of Poole Harbour (BoPH) team made the quick walk along Poole harbourfront to Lush’s Dolphin Quays offices to talk about the charity and the (surprisingly) numerous projects they’re all working on. BoPH founder Paul Morton and Liaison Officers Liv Cooper and Joe Parker gave an entertaining and zippy three-part presentation, explaining in an energised hour everything from how the group was founded and the local habitats and sites it has helped restore, to the launch of its ‘Engagement HQ’ and its flagship translocation Osprey Project.

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Status of birds in Korea: can you help?

Dr Nial Moores, Drector of Birds Korea, writes: “Birds Korea still appears to be the only organization ever to try to identify population trends in all of the nation’s most regularly occurring bird species. In our 2014 ground-breaking report, Status of Birds, we gathered data and information from a range of published and unpublished sources to suggest trends in 365 of the nation’s most regularly-occurring species.”

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