Tag: habitat loss

Who eats all the soya?

One of the biggest drivers of biodiversity loss is habitat loss to agriculture – in other words, enormous changes to natural habitats to grow our food. It’s estimated that as recently as 1000 years ago, less than 4% of the world’s ice-free and non-barren land area was used for farming. Now we have taken nearly HALF of all habitable land on the planet for our agriculture. The vast Cerrado region of Brazil, for example, once covered an area half the size of Europe, but around half the native savannah and forest of the Cerrado has been converted to agriculture since the late 1950s. Converted mainly for beef cattle ranching and to grow soybeans. Since the 1950s global soybean production has increased 15 times over. But who – or what – is eating all those beans…?

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Buglife | B Lines

Insect decline is inextricably linked with pesticides and habitat loss. The latter also leads to habitat fragmentation, pockets that are no longer linked and which have less species diversity. The charity Buglife has proposed setting up a nationwide system of insect ‘corridors’ they are calling ‘B Lines’. As they put it “We need to restore our countryside. We need to increase the number of wildflower-rich places, and we need to make sure that these areas are large enough to provide everything that pollinators need to thrive. We also need to join the dots. And that is where B-Lines comes in.”

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Guest post | The march of progress?

Over the last few years I have started to feel that the driving force is of ‘progress at any cost’, and that there have been minimal checks and allowances made for wildlife on some long-term development projects. For instance we have ‘suffered’ a major road expansion. Many people will have spent far too long on the A14, the major east-west route through the county, either before it was improved, or during the recent three years of its improvement. Right from the start many of us were horrified when trees containing rookeries were felled…Guest post by Louise Bacon

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Guest Post | Dr Nial Moores: One conservationist’s take on the COVID-19 Pandemic

“I am not a medical doctor and I do not pretend to have specialist knowledge or insights on the COVID-19 pandemic. Instead, as someone who lives in the Republic of Korea (ROK), I simply want to express my sympathies to those who are suffering and to give my sincerest thanks for the great response to the outbreaks that struck the nation back in February. This is why I agreed, happily, to do a podcast in mid-March for Lush’s fascinating War on Wildlife project. I also want to raise some specific concerns – most especially about the need for really strong biodiversity conservation measures in the months and years ahead.” Guest post by Dr Nial Moores, Birds Korea

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Podcast: Checking in with Megan McCubbin

Here at The War on Wildlife Project we were thinking that as us campaigners, conservationists, and activists can’t get out to meet and see each other now, how about creating something to bring the conservation community together – everyone from individuals to grassroots organisations to larger charities – something that reminds us all that we’re still out there, still working, but that also shows the human side of things during this COVID-19 crisis. We could think of them as ‘check-ins’ – as in ‘checking-in to make sure we’re all okay’.

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Wildflower Alley – mature hedge wrecked

Yesterday we wrote a post looking at Nesting Birds and the Law. We wrote it because at this time of year there are often problems with developers/gardeners trimming or removing hedgerows that may contain nesting birds. Today, writes Charlie Moores, we received news of the destruction of a 40 foot mature hedge in Belfast’s award-winning Wildflower Alley…

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Turtle Doves | Unsustainable hunting and habitat loss

It’s not so very long ago that the European Turtle Dove was such a common fixture of the UK summer that almost everyone would have recognised the rolling, purring ‘turr-turr’ call that gave the bird its English name. But, writes Charlie Moores, it’s now the UK’s fastest declining bird species and considered vulnerable to extinction across its entire range.

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Podcast: Sizewell C and the Suffolk Coast and Heaths AONB

French energy giant EDF Energy has submitted a proposal to build a new power station at Sizewell, adjoining two existing power stations Sizewell A and Sizewell B. The site lies in the heart of the Suffolk Coast and Heaths Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) and right next to the RSPB’s flagship reserve at Minsmere. EDF Energy says that Sizewell C has “the potential to generate the reliable low carbon energy the country needs for decades“, while opponents say the development will “lay waste” to vast swathes of the countryside – much of which is legally protected.

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